All of My Published Books



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EMPEROR PENGUINS:
The Other Global Warming 'Canary in the Coal Mine'

Theme: When reading this frosty novel about the warmest hearts living in the coldest place on earth, wear insulated outerwear! You’re about to shadow a stalwart penguin family seeking to solve a mystery where no penguin has gone before. 

Abstract: A curious new father penguin secretly embarks on a sub-zero trek to try and solve a problem of intermittent anomalous noises and ensuing tremors beneath his clan’s regional rookery. Little does he know his partner and their newborn chick are also following. If the father solves the riddle, will the trio make it back in time before the entire colony departs for the open water at the of the summer feeding season? This adventurous fable not only centers on the family’s daring quest but also on Emperor Penguin’s genetics and traits, including current scientific evidence based on Antarctica’s ongoing epic meltdown. Therefore, a factual scenario of likely catastrophic and unprecedented consequences is based on a continuing global warming phenomenon that threatens all Antarctic lifeforms, both terrestrial and aquatic. Not to spoil the conclusion of this family saga and escapade, even the author was astounded by how the narrative ended because it was as though the heroic family had made that decision for him.  


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RES DOG TALES ABOUT PAWS AND TAILS:
Homeless Strays on the Navajo Reservation

Theme: Amiable canines looking for love, treats to eat & a loving home. They also clean up nicely & will adore compassionate campers-turned-providers once rescued!

Abstract: If you love dogs, then you might extend such compassion for the affable strays featured in this genre fiction novel (which also includes sobering facts about their daily plight). Res dog vagamundos on the Navajo Reservation are forced to mooch meals from campers because it’s their only means to get fed. One among them, “Stumpi de Chelly” (pronounced “de shay”), who takes his name from this picturesque national monument near Chinle, Arizona, is the demure principal of this tale about tails whose CCC (Caring Canine Camaraderie) fellow mendicants watch over him. The reason for their concern is because Stumpi’s appearance is somewhat unassuming and he’s too bashful when it comes to attracting a camper’s attention for a handout. Accordingly, he often doesn’t get fed when the dogs make their daily rounds in the campground. With Stumpi’s missing tail, which is why he merits this nickname, he affects a sage, calm presence in the res dog’s close-knit community. Written for young to older adults, the storyline is based on notable details about their typical plight, which engenders awareness and compassion from some of the campers. Thus, the virtue of dogmanity. Given their usual mannerisms when on mooching rounds, most of their hard-luck community exemplify unique traits to try and capture a camper’s attention for that very reason—shared edibles. Some, like Stumpi, also resort to outlandish antics, including silly postures to do whatever it takes to get noticed, and, with any luck, a handout. That said, this sympathetic novel’s literary portrayal is also based on disconcerting facts about medical ailments and common nutritional deficiencies affecting most of the res dog community. Typically, their chances for survival are questionable, especially during colder, winter months when campers are fewer compared to warmer months. Indeed, the average lifespan of a res dog is a mere three or four years!


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DIETARY DECISIONS THAT ABET OR MAR THE ENVIRONMENT

Theme: If we are what we eat, then this palatable publication presents new ideas for environmentally-friendly choices or the opposite effect! The title of the book also describes the narrative’s underlying motif.

Abstract: The salient question when reading this manuscript’s treatise is whether one agrees with its touted premise expressed as a verifiable assertion: “Directly or indirectly, we are what we eat!” It follows how, in this open-minded composition (read, “not preachy”), the reader is invited to eavesdrop on nine friends dining at a posh Tucson Mediterranean restaurant, each of whom is engaged in a spirited repartee advocating their respective dietary preferences. There is also a reference to a sensitive issue of how the meat and dairy industries affect the environment at all levels. It follows how the candid ‘directly or indirectly’ remark is incontestable! Moreover, one’s dietary preference fits into both the equation AND the dialogue among this gathering of friends discussing this and other pertinent issues relative to food selections and preferences. The other eco-sensitive cautionary advice mentioned in their engaging and respective dialogues is the blatant fact what humans process for consumption has everything to do with a sustainable or non-sustainable environment, starting with soil and water sources. Apart from the debate throughout the first part of their meeting of minds and stomachs is a fitting dessert for the procurer of this two-part publication. Thus, pragmatic knowledge and awareness that might affect one’s subsequent food choices. In this instance, a variety of edibles either benefit or harm the environment at all levels. 

The second half of this volume is based on the author’s creative rewrite of  Grey’s Anatomy. Specifically, a laymen’s explanation of the human organs and various systems is presented in uncomplicated terminology. Ergo, easy reading and self-explanatory.


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GRAND CANYON'S GEOLOGIC TIME MACHINE:
A Literary Trek Through Primordial History

Theme: When hiking into North America’s oldest chasm, the further down-trail you go, the older you get. Either way, on the return, you will feel younger without the effort.

Abstract: Think of the Grand Canyon’s hiking pedometer averaging 17,000 steps  getting older via the South Kaibab Trail to the Colorado River, then returning to the South Rim via the Bright Angel Trail, averaging 20,000 steps getting younger. When applying the age factor metaphor to the oldest Vishnu Schist foundation at the bottom of the canyon (approximately 1,750,000,000 years), each step on the South Kaibab Trail equates to about 103,000 (+ or -) years. Consequently, the trek from the rim to the river is indeed analogous to a physical time machine. For hikers headed into the canyon via any trail, the growing older or younger factor amounts to a hiking timespan counting one step at a time: about 20,000 years! (By comparison, mules that ply either above-mentioned trail average 30,000 years due to their longer stride.) Keep in mind how the canyon’s symbolic clock of time begins around 251 million years, which is the age of the Kaibab Limestone rim on both sides of the canyon. Ergo, when hiking going down-trail to the river, the time machine effect registers close to 2 billion years. In other words, walking through some fifteen relatively younger to older formations from top to bottom, the concept of time here ranges from 251 million years to some 2 billion years. Presented with these astounding details, when calculating the geologic calendar based on the canyon’s numerous geologic era horizontal and vertical formations, H.G. Well’s time machine concept is no longer a fantasy. Expressly, trekking, so to say, is simply a matter of time. When purchasing a copy of this publication, the good news for the reader is the time-tripping odyssey on this self-guided literary tour is experienced only by one’s imagination. Hence, physical exercise is optional. Moreover, all of the engaging essentials of the Grand Canyon’s subject matter are presented in straightforward detail. Namely, the salient topics of geology, flora and fauna, human history, popular hiking trails, as well as miscellaneous concepts that describe the proverbial everything and anything about this Natural Wonder of the world.


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GLEN CANYON -- LAKE POWELL: 
The Wrong Damn Place to Build a Dam

Theme: The subtitle of this cogent tell-all monograph points the finger of shame and blame at the Bureau of ‘Wrecklamation.’ Ergo, it was the wrong goddamn place to build a dam & for all the wrong reasons!

Abstract: For those relative few who experienced Glen Canyon’s idyllic beauty before the massive Glen Canyon Dam was constructed, their common testimony and corresponding photos attest to what many people claimed was the most pristine canyon habitat carved by the Green and Colorado rivers. Because there were also relatively few roads in that vicinity, as one celebrated author and hiker dubbed the aftermath of the dam and The Glen’s flooded interior, “Beauty Lost.” This salient epithet is most assuredly an alternative portrayal and makeover since the 1980s, which started in the 1960s. Presented with “Glen Canyon’s Forecasted Flooded Legacy,” its chronicle and literary testimony of the old and newly remodeled Glen Canyon is indeed thorough. The index of pivotal topics herein also explains what the entire backcountry setting was before being swamped by hundreds of feet of water. The aforementioned author, George Steck, is also featured in the retelling of this second-longest chasm’s transition from a veritable canyon Eden to drowned environs. Namely, his float (rafting) trip through the interior in 1959. His was also the last private permit issued by the Park Service. Due to the previously scheduled dam construction. George and his river rat party’s leisurely and momentous excursion happened just before the Bureau of Reclamation closed the Colorado River not too far below Cataract Canyon and the Hite Crossing Bridge to the northwest of Blanding, Utah. Plausibly, what happened to the original Glen Canyon’s erosional template when its sandstone sanctuary was targeted for a dam site was early on challenged by protestors. Notably, David Brower who was then the Director of the Sierra Club, as well as the so-called curmudgeon of the Southwest, the author, Ed Abbey, and, of course, many other dissenting voices chorused the same concern. Those initial complaints by environmentalists were also based on natural environmental concerns the USBR (Bureau of Reclamation) under the helm of Floyd Dominy refused to acknowledge. Hence, it was the wrong place to build an alternative dam when the original dam site further upstream was protested by scores of pro-environmentalists, including the whole of the Sierra Club. Namely, the Green River Echo Park’s proposed dam site for the Colorado River Storage Project (close to Split Mountain and the Yampa River). Glen Canyon’s sedimentary sandstone facade was also a factor, especially because of the Colorado River’s high sedimentary particles flowing into the upper sector just below Cataract Canyon’s equally sedimentary terrain. Imperceptible to Lake Powell boaters and visitors, some environmentalists described that in-flowing silt as “the eco-warrior’s revenge,” which directly referred to Ed Abbey. (Notably, his radical “Monkey Wrench” publication.) Consequently, that gooey gunk never congeals. Its continuing accumulation’s grayish-colored creeping blob on the bottom of the lake is also unstoppable. Neither can it be removed. There was also one other quandary in those later years (the mid-1990s). This time, the protestor’s telling forecast was perceptible: drought. Affecting most of the Southwest and parts of the West, its prolonged dry spell could also be dubbed nature’s revenge. Moreover, the threat and potential death knell to thirsty terrain and lifeforms were predicted to be long-lasting. Alas, that prophecy also proved true due to the now-indisputable climate change phenomenon. 

Given these sobering and realistic facts predicated on silt fall-out combined with persistent pervasive drought, the pro and con debates between pro-environmentalists and the so-named “Friends of Lake Powell are ongoing. Then again, environmentalists are arbitrated and motivated by this reality that is based on other significant consequences. Namely, dramatic low lake levels that started in the mid-1990s, especially in the upper sector. In reality, the lower facade of Glen Canyon’s walls reveals a wide white scar on either side of the lake. This bleaching effect caused by constant exposure to the sun also directly corresponds to ongoing low lake levels. The same telltale scar is happening to Lake Mead, only worse. Averaging sixty-five feet (or more), these unsightly Q.E.D. scars just above both lakes are wider every year. Ergo, the reason several boat-launching ramps, as well as one major marina in the upper sector, were, and still are, rendered useless. As the pervasive drought persists, Lake Powell’s literal diminishing liquid assets will eventually close other ramps and marinas closer to the dam. The author’s revealing Before, During, and After treatise tells the entire story from the halcyon to the hellish, depending on whose rendition of the canyon-turned-reservoir one listens to, and believes is the true version of Glen Canyon’s changeover since the late 1950s.


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ANASAZI TO ANCESTRAL PUEBLOANS:
First Native People Who Settled in the Four Corners Region

Theme: Augmenting their hunter-gathering tradition, the Anasazi were stewards of the land, earning their singular designation, dryland farmers. They are also accredited with establishing spectacular settlements such as Mesa Verde, Aztec Ruins, Hovenweep, and Chaco Canyon.

Abstract: This compendium of topics is a 15-volume literary miniseries that features the most celebrated primeval culture that was the only prehistoric-era tribal people to live year-round in sectors of the Colorado Plateau for over one thousand years. Namely, the Anasazi. Using the axis point of Cortez, Colorado, this modern-day tourist-haven sector of the Southwest is thought to be their starting point whose various tribal sects arrived sometime before the start of the Common Era (i.e., 500 to 100 BCE). Early on, they constructed small settlements in this region, then migrated further out from the axis, cultivating fields while continuing their hunter-gatherer tradition. What sets the Anasazi apart from other tribal people who also frequented the Four Corners region is they planted and harvested fields, resulting in the so-called “three sister crops.” Consisting of corn (maize), a variety of squash, and beans, this is why they earned the designation, “dryland farmers” because of the prevailing semi-arid climate. Eventually, they fanned out and constructed permanent and larger settlements such as Mesa Verde, Hovenweep, Canyons of the Ancients (Cedar Mesa vicinity), and even the most incredible archeoastronomy site in North America, Chaco Canyon. These veritable stewards of the land were indeed peerless people who had accomplished what no other native people did at the time: permanent year-round settlement. Written in the guise of an encyclopedia, the reader determines what topics to read or ignore. The titles of the volumes in this factual and comprehensive publication are as follows:

AN ENCAPSULATED PRIMER; A GEORITUAL LANDSCAPE, the UTILITY OF POTTERY; ROCK ART; INTRO TO ARCHAEOASTRONOMY; CHACO CANYON ARCHAEOASTRONOMY; ARCHEOLOGICAL BENCHMARKS; CANNIBALISM IN THE SOUTHWEST; THE GREAT DROUGHT AND DIASPORA; THE PUEBLOANS; THE HOPI PEOPLE; THE ZUÑI PEOPLE; A TIME MACHINE EXCURSION; and the 130,000 mi2 COLORADO PLATEAU PROVINCE due west of the Rocky Mountains.

The mystique and mystery centered on the Anasazi culture are typically subject to conjecture and refutation because there is no written record. Moreover, cultural scientists (i.e., archeologists and anthropologists) do not know the true name of these primal people, other than today’s common appellation, the ANCESTRAL PUEBLOANS (since the 1990s). However, the lyrical-sounding “ANASAZI” honorific is, in some anthological circles, also still popular. By any designation, arguably, their culture and community denote North America’s most renowned prehistoric people consisting of numerous tribal bands that assimilated into a larger community over time. It should also be noted how the HOPI PEOPLE who are part of New Mexico’s nineteen society of Puebloans, refer to their ancestors as the “Hisatsinom,” meaning the “Ancient Ones.” They are also the only former Anasazi tribal people who remained in the Four Corners region after all the other sects migrated northeast to what would one day be called New Mexico (in the late 13th century).


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GRAND CANYON CREATION STORY: 
Facts, Myths, and Hyperbole Explained

Theme: This factual exegesis and A to Z essentials chronicle the original template before there even was a canyon. P.S. The chasm’s initial inception did not begin in the northeast!

Abstract: An edifying three-part compact digest and easy-to-comprehend interpretation of all the timely steps in the process. Readers also choose to peruse or omit a wide range of subject matter at one’s discretion. Informative topics include the following subject matter: geology, archeology, natural history (flora & fauna), a concise explanation of varying ecozones from the rim to the river, human history (notably, the Anasazi culture), hiking trail descriptions, relevant theories about the so-called “canyon creation story,” and a historical summary of Major John Wesley Powell’s 19th-century canyon country exploration of the Green & Colorado rivers, including the first science-based survey of the so-named “Great Unknown,” which he later renamed the “Grand Canyon. This volume’s abridged literary tour elucidates the everything an anything about the Grand Canyon without the rigors of academic or scientific minutiae. As a bonus, the text includes colored photographs (the author’s), graphics, and illustrations.

The following Table of Contents confirms all the above noteworthy details if not a subtle sales promotion boast:

Part I: GEOLOGY IS NOT ALWAYS JUST ABOUT THE ROCKS!
Walk or run to page 6

Part II: NATURAL & HUMAN HISTORY & HIKING TRAILS 
Walk or run to page 25

Part III: THE ‘CANYON CREATION STORY’ EXPLAINED IN MORE DETAIL
Walk or run to page 56

ADDENDA

I: LEXICON OF GEOLOGY: An Essential Working Vocabulary 
Maybe visit page 90

II: THE AGE OF THE EARTH: In Rock Chapter Eras
Maybe visit page 93

III: GEOLOGY: Just The Basics
Maybe visit page 96

IV: METHODS OF DATING ROCKS AND ARCHEOLOGIC SITES
Maybe visit page 98

V: RULES OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL ROAD
Maybe visit page 101

VI: THE SPLENDOR OF THE COLORADO PLATEAU PROVINCE
Maybe visit page 103

VII: THE ANCESTRAL PUEBLOANS: An Abstract
Maybe visit page 118


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MAJESTIC MONOLITHS AND MEMORIALS:
Monument Valley's Iconic Visual Fantasy

Theme: The Navajo Nation’s stunning panorama with colossal erosional landmarks mimics a vast Western movie stage set. Remarkably, each monument personifies an engaging effigy rising from broad dished valley environs.  

Abstract: Just north of Kayenta, Arizona (22 miles) is arguably one of the most scenic erosional vistas in the American Southwest. Given this dished valley’s expansive backdrop (1,100 square miles), Monument Valley’s prized showcase of downsizing mesas, buttes, and totems decorating its Great Basin Desert environs, when it comes to peerless Out West scenery, folks, THIS IS IT! It’s also the heart of  Indian Country. Some of the landmarks rise1,000 feet from the sandstone base, most of which are lionized decorative features seen in numerous Western movies filmed here since the late 1930s Indeed, one of the Valley’s many vistas overlooks along the 17-mile unpaved road is named John Ford’s Point, who was the most famous movie directors lured here by Harry Goulding (owner of Harry Goulding's trading post) to do just that. Ford’s most famous cowboy, John Wayne,  essentially got his first big movie role filmed here (“Stagecoach”). Other than the impressive backdrop scenery, Monument Valley typifies an engaging geologic open textbook, mainly sedimentary rock formations ranging from the Permian to the mid-Jurassic  Periods. (Mesozoic Era). The three major formations that form the majority of the aptly-named monuments are the Organ Rock Formation, De Chelly Formation, and the Moenkopi Formations. All these mixed sandstone, shale, and mudstone materials were laid down millions of years go, then later exposed to wind and water erosion. Additionally, numerous other igneous rocks decorate this wide, far sector, which are referred to as volcanic plugs, each marking so-called dike intrusions. The most famous is the volcanic diatreme, Agathla Peak, rising some 1,500 feet (457 m) from a somewhat barren desert buckled floor. This high-elevation sector (7,000 feet above sea level) of northern Arizona and southeastern Utah is also part of the sprawling Navajo Nation Reservation. When visiting Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, always treat the land, the people, and numerous res dog and cat homeless strays with respect. As the Navajos are fond of saying—Yá’át'ééh (Welcome)! Take lots of pictures but ask, first, before you take their photos.


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GLEN CANYON'S SHRINE OF THE AGES:
The “Cathedral in the Desert”

Theme: Before the literal drowning of the Southwest’s second-longest canyon in the early 1980s, its environs were considered the most pastoral terrestrial Eden of the Southwest! Ergo, sine qua non!

Abstract: This sequel to the larger companion magnum opus, “Glen Canyon’s Forecasted Flooded Legacy” is a descriptive testimony about the canyon’s most idyllic sandstone altar, the aptly named “Cathedral in the Desert.” Before the dam and the immensely long and deep lake it created, Glen Canyon aficionados had deemed this idyllic milieu of erosional sculpture the holy of holies. One of the numerous backcountry amphitheaters (aka “alcoves”), the Cathedral’s colossal sandstone tableau was embellished with striated desert varnish, and enhanced by a slender veil of water funneling through a fissure, ending in a clear, shallow pool. Presented with Glen Canyon’s original au natural habitat, such praise and symbolic imagery were common in those years. For those fortunate visitors who sought to discover The Glen’s most acclaimed backcountry and scenic sandstone treasures, some travelers drove far to the north and east. Fairly close to the San Juan River that merged with the usually muddy Colorado River, they hiked into Clear Creek Canyon’s sinuous and narrow corridor. Once, at the end of the 1.5-mile pathway, they beheld for the first time the most serene setting imaginable, and were speechless—the Cathedral’s sandstone sanctuary was that venerated, although not in a pious sense. As for the author’s manuscript, surprisingly, when the nearly 200-mile-long reservoir was briefly exposed in the upper region because of a prolonged drought that started in the mid-1990s, this sector of the lake was exposed for a brief window of time (2005). The author was also one of the relatively few fortunate hikers who visited the Cathedral and its rock altar. To quote a suitable cliché: Silence is Golden, indeed! Most assuredly, I was also speechless. In truth, blown away was the better expression.


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SELF-GUIDED ROAD TOURS OF THE SOUTHWEST: 
National Parks, Monuments & Archeological Ruin
Volume I

Theme: The How, What, When, Where, and Why essentials about this, that, and the everything about picturesque places. When traveling, don’t leave home without it!

Abstract: Welcome to an informative tour-de-force sightseeing travel guide. In this two-volume series, readers/travelers explore and learn about a plethora of scenic and historic icons scattered throughout the American Southwest, including some of the West. Featuring the best of the best National Parks, Monuments, and Anasazi archeological ruins, including State and Tribal parks, the road tour directory begins and ends in popular tourist hubs. For example, Flagstaff, Arizona features Sunset Crater, Walnut Canyon, Grand Falls of the Little Colorado, Wupatki, Painted Desert (northern environs), Old Oraibi –– Keams Canyon (Hopi Mesas), Homol’ovi, Meteor Crater, Cameron Trading Post, the Little Colorado River Gorge Overlook, and the Grand Canyon via Desert View (eastern sector of the South Rim). The reader not only chooses what tourist hubs to see and learn about but also which places to read or omit in the self-guided tour. With this brief digest in mind, both volumes catalog nearly ninety celebrated destinations. All the particulars about each featured listing are also presented straightforwardly. For instance, learning geology essentials, natural history (flora & fauna), and human history. Other relevant topics such as hiking trails relative to each setting, ethnobotany, and archeoastronomy such as Chaco Canyon are also presented in both volumes. As a special bonus, every destination includes geographic coordinates, contact information, and directions for getting there. Presented with such benefits for sightseers, readers choose only those listed topics that hold their interest. The explanation applicable to every destination also progresses from the most basic to more detailed. 

Note: Starting from any designated tourist hub, sightseers would likely drive from one place to the other in a recommended sequence (i.e., connecting the dots as it were). However, in this complete road tour series, all the scenic attractions are listed alphabetically, which makes it easier to select or skip any destination featured in every tourist hub. As previously mentioned, readers-drivers choose only those places on the tour that appeals to one’s interests. Likewise, any destination can be omitted or selected at another time. With these notable points in mind, think of this compact self-guided tour in the guise of an encyclopedia. As your literary tour guide along the way, happy trails wherever you wander and wonder.  


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ROMANCE AND REDEMPTION IN THE ROCKIES: 
A Convoluted But Coquettish Novel!

Theme: Amorous entanglements, a Victorian haunted mansion, a fetching feline abhorred the visiting specter & small-town social politics. Ta-da! the impassioned plot of this unduly dramatic novel.

Abstract: Based on true characters whose names have been changed to protect the not-so-innocent in this long-running narrative. Given the three leading characters of the story, especially their respective and interactive dramatics, their three-way amorous affair qualifies the subtitle of this multifaceted novel. It all begins with an invite for Lux Carey to move to a reputed quiet hamlet some sixty miles north of Denver, Georgetown. The invite is from his good friend, Ailis Finnin, which she offered soon after Lux returned from Paris where he anticipated a Christmas visit from his fiancé, Shannon, who, instead, sent him the proverbial ‘Dear John’ letter. Broken-hearted, Lux’s spirits were understandably broken. Moreover, he had no idea what he was going to do once back in Denver, and, of course, no longer engaged. This is where his long-term friend, Ailis, once again walks into his life. Thus, proposing that he should consider moving into her family’s Victorian mansion and vacation home, and serve in the role of a caretaker. Ergo, an opportunity to heal his ongoing emotional wounds. In the meantime, his friend-turned-possible future landlady offer was indeed tempting. Soon after arriving, and seeing the charming Victorian hamlet and so-called “Silver Queen of the Rockies,” Lux tours the prepossessing residence that is replete with priceless antiques and turn-of-the-century furnishings. Thus, he thinks the house Ailis named Skye Keep is closer to a museum than a palatial hideaway to take time out and do what Ailis says will be good for his broken heart and troubled soul (her words). Finally, he accepts the offer. Little does he know Ailis concealed amorous desires are not only seeking his caretaker’s services but because she has always admired his affable nature and sexy charm (again, her words). Once settled in as the caretaker, soon begins another twist to this engaging, though convoluted narrative, although ‘theatrics’ is a better noun to describe the imminent and literal affair in the making. Ergo, Lux eventually becomes Ailis’ secret paramour—secret because she is also ‘happily’ married to Caelan, a doctor, who privately accepts Ailis’ plans for a confidential ménage à trois affair, the same as he prefers for himself. In time, Lux meets an attractive Georgetown shop owner, Kat Priory, who soon finds herself privately attracted to the striking and amiable ‘newbie’ in town. Then again, Kat is not friendly with Ailis, and for a variety of reasons She also senses Ailis is having a secret affair with Lux. So begins a new ménage à trois, and, this time, based on the contentious rivalry between Lux’s two competitive suitors. Consequently, Lux is caught in the proverbial middle and is confused given one of two options: break off his relationship with Ailis and move to Denver, and possibly somewhere else, or accept Kat’s amorous and lustful enticements. Therefore, remain in Georgetown, only no longer Ailis’ caretaker or paramour. Further complicating this romantic debacle is when Shannon visits Georgetown seeking reconciliation with Lux. From there, an already romantic thorny drama gets even more dramatic. 

Postscript: Thanks to a plump homeless Georgetown cat who Lux decides to rescue and move into Skye Keep, this endearing feline also has plans for her new cat care person. As Lux’s amorous dilemma eventually turns out, he and the cat he named “GT” depart Georgetown, therefore putting an end to a veritable three-way competitive romantic affair by deciding to live with the cat in another locale far from the charm and seduction of Georgetown. Ergo, a happy ending for Lux and the cat. 


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EXPLORING PEERLESS PLACES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST:
National Parks, Monuments & Archeological Ruins

Theme: Seeing spectacular scenery is one thing while knowing and learning the essentials behind such splendors is another. This traveler’s guidebook is the literary key to doing just that!

Abstract: This self-explanatory 484-page volume showcases all the prominent and picturesque places scattered across the aptly-named Four Corners region where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah merge their respective borders. There are also other locales to the West, including the Rocky Mountains to the east that are presented in this teeming text of featured scenic icons. Accordingly, no traveler should be without this handbook featuring some ninety must-see National Parks, National Monuments, State and Tribal Parks, and Archeological ruins. To mention some of the many celebrated locales: the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Canyon de Chelly, Mesa Verde, Bryce and Zion canyons, Death Valley, Yosemite, and Rocky Mountain National Park, Kiet Siel and Betatakin, and Chaco Canyon. This tour-de-educational-force handbook explains in a simple, direct language all the essentials that graduate from the basic to more detailed information, which readers also choose to read or omit. Ergo, the how, what, where, when, and why particulars, including the ‘who’ (human history), all of which are relevant to every destination listed in the directory. To put it another way, when traveling, some tourists only want to see the sights. Therefore, learning little or nothing about such popular attractions. Then again, others desire knowledge such as geology, natural and human history, and other germane essentials that appeal to one’s interest or will appeal once learned. Take for example the Grand Canyon whose peerless geologic backdrop is not only wondrous to the eye but also curious to the brain; at least, for those who behold its engaging and colorful showcase while sensing there is something more compelling beyond the engaging panorama. In this case, knowledge. Take this teasing suggestion and apply it to all the other enticing places featured in this volume’s self-guided literary tour, then become a road tour Buddha: thus enlightened!


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A TRAVELER’s GUIDE TO NATIONAL PARKS, MONUMENTS, AND ARCHEOLOGICAL RUINS IN THE SOUTHWEST

Theme: Another anthology featuring all other notable places and germane subject matter for self-learning scrutiny.

Abstract: In this sequel to “Exploring Peerless Places In The American Southwest,” this equally informative traveler’s guide is presented in more detail.

This sequel volume also finds its primary focus on specialized and analogous topics whose subject matter is indeed intrinsic to such feature places of interest. For instance:

Archeology, the Pecos Classification System (i.e., explanation of the archeological timeline), a Geologic Analysis of the Earth), a Geologic Lexicon, Plate Tectonics, Archaeoastronomy (i.e., Chaco Canyon), “Dinosauria” (i.e., the study of dinosaurs and the Earth’s primal history), Ethnobotany, Desert Ecology, “Rock Art” (i.e., “glyphs” as in the study of petroglyphs and pictographs), Pottery of the Anasazi and Puebloans, the Colorado Plateau Province due west of the Rockies, Acclaimed tourist-minded metropolises in the Southwest (i.e., Albuquerque, Phoenix, and Tucson), Popular Tourist Town Meccas in the Southwest (i.e., Jerome, Sedona, Taos, Cortez, and Moab, among numerous others), the History of the Navajo, THE Hopi, Slot Canyons, Hiking Icons, and Popular Trails throughout the Four Corners region, The Art of Backpacking, newly added national parks and monuments. Other incidental topics include the Glen Canyon-Lake Powell’s damaging environmental story, the Durango & Silverton Railroad excursion, a History of Route 66, Old Tucson Movie Studios and the Pima Air Museum (also, Tucson), Kitt Peak Observatory, and the Very Large Array, among other featured attractions and topics. “A Travel Guide,” like its sequel companion guidebook, can be read cover to cover or piecemeal. Therefore, engaging topics and destinations appeal to the reader’s interest.


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GRAND CANYON SELF-GUIDED TOUR:
Leaving No Stone Unturned!

Theme: An instructive tell-all compendium about the germane essentials, turning readers into know-it-all Canyon Buddhas. Thus, enlightened! 

Abstract: For any Grand Canyon guidebook, “interpretation” entails an exposition of facts describing the how-what-where-when-where-why aspects based on the canyon’s process of creation. The particulars also include an explanation when there was nothing here except a huge blank spot on nature’s map. The thesis in this cover-to-cover exposition fosters such a literary template and is likely the largest and most comprehensive Grand Canyon volume on the market. Moreover, edifying details herein take the reader on an educated self-guided stroll along the South Rim using key vista overlooks that explain everything about this Natural Wonder. The exchange of information is also presented in an easy-to-understand language, including the usually complicated geology academics. As a bonus to the reader, the changing subject matter is divided into graduating segments describing various science disciplines associated with the canyon’s ongoing fabrication (i.e., natural and chemical erosion), a brimming summary of the canyon’s flora & fauna, human history (i.e., from the Anasazi to prospectors and pioneers), and travel and helpful tourist information (i.e., hotels, restaurants, shopping, what to see and do, etc.). What the ‘graduating segments’ reference implies is how all of the information is explained from the most basic to the more entailed aspects where the reader decides how much or how little to read and think about. In other words, at any given vista’s tour guide sermon on the mount (in this case, the rim), the reader is never overwhelmed with too much information. Consequently, and like any encyclopedia featuring an A to Z index of topics, the reader chooses what to hear and think about, as in perusing or disregarding. With this all-inclusive digest based on the ‘“Grand Canyon Rim-To-River Exposition,” folks, THIS IS IT! Acting as the reader’s tour guide, get ready for an illuminating tour-de-force like no other. 

P.S. No gratuities are necessary!


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SELF GUIDED TOURS OF THE SOUTHWEST
Volume II

Theme: The How, What, When, Where, and Why essentials based on this, that, and the everything about picturesque places. When traveling, don’t leave home without it!

Abstract: Welcome to another informative tour-de-force sightseeing travel guide. In this continuing *2-volume series, readers/travelers explore and learn about a plethora of scenic and historic icons scattered throughout the American Southwest, including some of the West. Featuring the best of the best National Parks, Monuments, and Anasazi archeological ruins, including State and Tribal parks, the road tour directory begins and ends in popular tourist hubs. For example, Flagstaff, Arizona features Sunset Crater, Walnut Canyon, Grand Falls of the Little Colorado, Wupatki, Painted Desert (northern environs), Old Oraibi –– Keams Canyon (Hopi Mesas), Homol’ovi, Meteor Crater, Cameron Trading Post, the Little Colorado River Gorge Overlook, and the Grand Canyon via Desert View (eastern sector of the South Rim). The reader not only chooses what tourist hubs to see and learn about but also which places to read or omit in the self-guided tour. With this brief digest in mind, both volumes catalog nearly ninety celebrated destinations. All the particulars about each featured listing are also presented straightforwardly. For instance, learning geology essentials, natural history (flora & fauna), and human history. Other relevant topics such as hiking trails relative to each setting, ethnobotany, and archeoastronomy such as Chaco Canyon are also presented in both volumes. As a special bonus, every destination includes geographic coordinates, contact information, and directions for getting there. Presented with such benefits for sightseers, readers choose only those listed topics that hold their interest. The explanation applicable to every destination also progresses from the most basic to more detailed. 

Note: Starting from any designated tourist hub, sightseers would likely drive from one place to the other in a recommended sequence (i.e., connecting the dots as it were). However, in this complete road tour series, all the scenic attractions are listed alphabetically, which makes it easier to select or skip any destination featured in every tourist hub. As previously mentioned, readers-drivers choose only those places on the tour that appeals to one’s interests. Likewise, any destination can be omitted or selected at another time. With these notable points in mind, think of this compact self-guided tour in the guise of an encyclopedia. As your literary tour guide along the way, happy trails wherever you wander and wonder. 


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MAJOR JOHN WESLEY POWELL:
A Faux Stage Play About the 1869 Green and Colorado Rivers Surveys

Theme: An impartial account of the exacting Green & Colorado river surveys presented in the guise of a theatrical performance. Hence, verification of facts as recited by three diarists presented to an imaginary audience (i.e., readers).

Abstract: Major Powell’s canyon exploring odyssey via the Green and Colorado rivers amounted to exacting on-the-job training for all the novice boatmen some of whom went for no pay. The 1869 venture was also the first official scientific exploration of the mostly unknown Utah and Arizona canyon country. Therefore, endorsed and partially funded by the Federal Government; at least, in part. This factual monograph describes Powell’s historically renowned saga, which is also creatively retold by the three so-named “diarists”: the major, Jack Sumner, and George Bradley. Reciting daily entries from their respective diary notes, their combined account of events throughout that inaugural 1869 expedition are factual and corresponding (i.e., somewhat of a corollary). However, George Bradley’s expanded version (read, “wordy”) is more personal (read, “informative”); that is his confidential observations, which none of the crew realized he kept a private diary. The notable drawback given their respective performance to a feigned audience is the fact Major Powell failed to mention there were TWO back-to-back expeditions. Given his 1869 memoirs, in his pioneering tome, “The Exploration of the Colorado River and its Canyons,” the Major’s critical literary blunder was the fact he never mentioned the names of the second crew on the longer 1871-71 expedition. Eventually, this oversight and allegation were revealed in 1907 by one of the 1871 boatmen, Frederick Dellenbaugh. Understandably, Powell’s discrepancy was not well received by the public and key government figures, especially one of Powell’s most severe critics, Bill Bass, who was a former Grand Canyon prospector and pioneer turned canyon host (for visitors). Bass also makes an appearance in the author’s historical tome, serving in the role of a Greek Chorus who shares other important and incidental background information with the audience. As a consequence of Major Powell’s alleged faux pas, his acclaimed reputation since both successful expeditions was indeed tarnished. For the reader of this paid-for seat in an imaginary theater, the amended theatrical performance is not only an explicative revelation but also factual, informative, and revealing. For Major Powell, that timely disclosure challenged by Dellenbaugh was also embarrassing. Nevertheless, once all the facts are explained, what follows in this theatrical and historical performance is something the reader must decide. Thus, was the major guilty as charged, or were there other mitigating circumstances that diminish the public’s consequent accusations and finger-pointing shame?


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TRANSFIGURATION: WHEN I SEE THE TREE, I AM THE TREE!

Theme: A combined poetic and prose sylvan sojourn engendering a transpersonal and transcendental state of mind, body, and spirit. Ergo, eternity expressed in the moment!

Abstract: Join me for a sylvan countryside outing describing Autumn’s Now-Present throughout a 24-hour’s scrutiny of Nature’s changing expression and moods. This essay of imagery and poetry includes captivating B/W sketches that enhance a lyrical portrayal of the Earth Mother, almost romanticized. A sample stanza follows:

Seeking seclusion, I traversed backroads into the backcountry; 
my desires set on the hinterland where edifices, like people —
Were preferably few.

Down an unbridled path I hiked, aroused by serendipity;
an escapade underway with sentiments heartened —
My life anew.

 The second half of this treatise on Nature relates prose and imagery verses in the format of 7 lines followed by a 3-like reiteration. Thus, the semblance of a conscious voice and an ensuing subconscious response:

Somber stillness breeds silence like a prayer.
A narrow old rickety wooden bridge
creaks and moans under my equivocal steps.
I hurry past the expanse of down-reaching chasm
echoing padded sounds of roaring water's wash.
Anxious lifting footsteps carry me up, UP, UP
through skinny walls of ponderosa, spruce, and fir.

There is meditation only on the movement of the body 
and its winded breathing; unity with all that is encountered:
To go, but to expect nothing!

Ergo, a meditative depiction accounting for another 24-hour ‘watch’ on Nature’s changing mood and expression.

From the author’s favored passage in the book, the sentiment states:

It is a day of such perfect symmetry where everything is in its place. I am Nature’s willing consort. The experience that filters through my senses is as it should be. I feel this candor resonates within the heart chakra. Prana, life’s vital force as explained in Vedantic philosophy, results as a consequence. I am in awe knowing that I am a part of the fusion of creation that places me in my own time and being-ness. What greater happiness is there with spiritual recognition and revival such as this? I think there is none. Indeed, the more I surrendered to Nature’s changing moods, the more I was rejuvenated as though reborn. Being outdoors always affects me this way.


This publication also includes numerous black/white photographs and drawings. Read the more informative synopsis posted on my Amazon Author's Page.


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LIFE-CHANGING FLIGHT PLANS:
A Fateful Quest And Fall From Wings
Volume 1

Theme: A faceted dramatic novel on many levels whose two-volume chronicle defines the protagonist’s post-crash physical & emotional recovery within the context of a seeming lifetime.

Abstract: Wrought with existential, spiritual, and confidential vendetta turned into redemption, the traumatic circumstances Lux Carey faces after returning to Denver due to a near-fatal plane crash are requisite consequences he has to endure before he can make his fractured life whole again. Hence, altering a perplexing psychological trauma by transforming his private hell and resentment (read, “self-pity”) back to his former outgoing demeanor. Starting with forgiveness for himself, then two others that he feels alienated, the remedy he searches for is clear enough while his troubled mind and spirits remain locked inside his subdued self-esteem. Defining such a multifaceted novel maintains this vexing theme that is based on true events and real people while using fictitious names whose chronicle takes place in a little over a year. As a comprehensive, yet mitigated, memoir, citing this declaration defines the protagonist’s sentiment about the momentous plane crash (read, “physically and emotionally devastating”) predicated on this gloomy revelation: Sometimes, aspiring dreams have an unpleasant way of failing and falling in mid-flight. In Lux’s case, his rude awakening to reality happened early on in a planned cross-country flight flying a WW II-era airplane. 

As for the bedrock factors of this story’s biographical account based on a true story and saga, its impassioned subject matter is based on the aforementioned virtue of redemption, and, eventually, followed by healing of both the body and soul due to deep-set wounds that literally turned Lux Carey’s life inside out. Nearly the same psychological stress also happens to his wife, JoHanna, and, especially, Lux’s best friend, Walt, who was piloting the airplane at the time. For Lux, however, his physical and emotional tribulations were far worse. To put it another way: if he thought the crash was the worst that could happen to him, given that shocking and unsuspected event flying the so-called training flight and mission with Walt, who was also an airlines captain and principal flight instructor in Wyoming, everything that followed after the crash was far more demanding. Indeed, before Lux discovers the veritable essence that centers on man’s search for the meaning of life and one’s purposeful role in the process, he will learn the harsher lesson of another popular adage: Sometimes to lose one’s self is the only way to find one’s self after the search is over. To use other keywords and subjects that define the overall literary motif of this suspenseful, yet hopeful novel, the following descriptions describe both the subjective and objective aspects, which include the following interludes: Lux’s transpersonal spiritual experience just prior to the crash, in this case, an out of body experience and mesmerizing by a singular and encircling white light; a paradigmatic life-changing experience where the expression, “To get something, sometimes it’s necessary to let go” because sometimes plans and dreams have an unpleasant and untimely way of falling in mid-flight; the ensuing drama and trauma rigors when his former and somewhat contented marriage and state of mind falters, including an enduring friendship with Walt that was tested and almost failed for both of them. Despite the ominous undertones that permeate the storyline, what Walt had previously described to Lux before their rendezvous back East was indeed telling: “The upcoming flight will be a veritable barnstormer’s dream come true” whose pet phrase refers to early 20th century aviators piloting primitive aircraft. Hearing Walt’s enticing and encouraging statement, that’s what finally persuaded Lux to depart Denver (where he lived at the time, meet Walt and the owner of the plane, in North Caroline, then fly the questionable excursion, as well as eventually experience a Homeric barnstorming odyssey that ultimately crashed in mid-flight—ironically, on the first day—by which all else followed, starting with tragedy.


For a more detailed synopsis, please take a cyber hike to this URL:

LIFE-CHANGING FLIGHT PLANS:
A Fateful Quest And Fall From Wings
Volume 2

Theme: A faceted dramatic novel on many levels whose two-volume chronicle defines the protagonist’s post-crash physical & emotional recovery within the context of a seeming lifetime.

Abstract: Continuing this novel’s narrative, wrought with existential, spiritual, and confidential vendetta turned into redemption, the traumatic circumstances Lux Carey faces after returning to Denver due to a near-fatal plane crash are requisite consequences he has to endure before he can make his fractured life whole again. Hence, altering a perplexing psychological trauma by transforming his private hell and resentment (read, “self-pity”) back to his former outgoing demeanor. Starting with forgiveness for himself, then two others that he feels alienated, the remedy he searches for is clear enough while his troubled mind and spirits remain locked inside his subdued self-esteem. Defining such a multifaceted novel maintains this vexing theme that is based on true events and real people while using fictitious names whose chronicle takes place in a little over a year. As a comprehensive, yet mitigated, memoir, citing this declaration defines the protagonist’s sentiment about the momentous plane crash (read, “physically and emotionally devastating”) predicated on this gloomy revelation: Sometimes, aspiring dreams have an unpleasant way of failing and falling in mid-flight. In Lux’s case, his rude awakening to the reality that happened early on in a planned cross-country flight flying a WW II-ear airplane. As for the bedrock factors of this novel’s biographical account, its impassioned subject matter is based on the aforementioned virtue of redemption, and, eventually, followed by healing of both the body and soul due to deep-set wounds that literally turned Lux Carey’s life inside out. Nearly the same psychological stress also happens to his wife, JoHanna, and, especially, Lux’s best friend, Walt, who was piloting the airplane at the time. For Lux, however, his physical and emotional tribulations were far worse. To put it another way: if he thought the crash was the worst that could happen to him, given that shocking and unsuspected event flying the so-called training flight and mission with Walt, who was also an airlines captain and principal flight instructor in Wyoming, everything that followed after the crash was far more demanding. Indeed, before Lux discovers the veritable essence that centers on man’s search for the meaning of life and one’s purposeful role in the process, he will learn the harsher lesson of another popular adage: Sometimes to lose one’s self is the only way to find one’s self after the search is over.

To use other keywords and subjects that define the overall literary motif of this suspenseful, yet hopeful novel, the following descriptions describe both the subjective and objective aspects, which include the following interludes: Lux’s transpersonal spiritual experience just prior to the crash, in this case, an out of body experience and mesmerizing by a singular and encircling white light; a paradigmatic life-changing experience where the expression, “To get something, sometimes it’s necessary to let go” because sometimes plans and dreams have an unpleasant and untimely way of falling in mid-flight; the ensuing drama and trauma rigors when his former and somewhat contented marriage and state of mind falters, including an enduring friendship with Walt that was tested and almost failed for both of them. Despite the ominous undertones that permeate the storyline, what Walt had previously described to Lux before their rendezvous back East was indeed telling: “The upcoming flight will be a veritable barnstormer’s dream come true” whose pet phrase refers to early 20th century aviators piloting primitive aircraft. Hearing Walt’s enticing and encouraging statement, that’s what finally persuaded Lux to depart Denver (where he lived at the time, meet Walt and the owner of the plane, in North Caroline, then fly the questionable excursion, as well as eventually experience a Homeric barnstorming odyssey that ultimately crashed in mid-flight—ironically, on the first day—by which all else followed, starting with tragedy.


For a more detailed synopsis, please take a cyber hike to this URL:

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